.

 SISTERS HELPING EACH OTHER REACH A HIGHER HEIGHT 

HUMAN TRAFFICKING

Support our Human Trafficking Work by attending an event or joining our Human Trafficking Task Force

DOMESTIC CHILD SEX TRAFFICKING AND BLACK GIRLS ( VIA RIGHTS4GIRLS.ORG)

WHAT IS DOMESTIC CHILD SEX TRAFFICKING? 

Domestic Child Sex Trafficking (DCST)—also known as “domestic minor sex trafficking,” “survival sex,” “child prostitution,” and “juvenile prostitution”—is the exchange of anything of value (e.g., food, shelter or money) for sex with a person under 18. 

 RISK FACTORS 

Childhood trauma and instability make children more vulnerable to being trafficked. 

Risk factors for domestic child sex trafficking include, but are not limited to:

1. Being between the ages of 12 and 14

2. Having a history of sexual and physical abuse

3. Community and family instability and dislocation

4. Poverty

5. Being Female      

6. History of child protective services and/or foster care involvement                                                                                                                                       

BLACK GIRLS ARE DISPOPORTIONATELY AT-RISK 

Black girls are more likely to experience the risk factors listed above. Studies report that black girls become trafficked at younger ages than their racial counterparts.They are more likely to experience poverty, and consequently more likely to be disconnected from schools and other community supports. Black girls experience physical and sexual abuse at young ages and witness and experience multiple forms of violence at higher rates than their white peers.  In 2012, 26% of children in the foster care system were black. 

THE MAJORITY OF VICTIMS OF DCST ARE BLACK GIRLS

 According to the FBI, black children comprise 52% of all juvenile prostitution arrests—more than any other racial group.viii In a two-year review of all suspected human trafficking incidents, 40% of victims of sex trafficking were black.